USS Omaha - Academic Dictionaries and Encyclopedias.

USS Omaha (CL-4) was the lead ship of Omaha-class light cruiser, originally classified as a scout cruiser, of the United States Navy. She was the second US Navy ship named for the city of Omaha, Nebraska. She spent most of her career in the Atlantic. At this time her primary mission was training, and she proved to be very capable by consistently winning fleet awards in gunnery and.

Omaha class light cruiser

A light cruiser is a type of small- or medium-sized warship.. USS Raleigh, an Omaha-class cruiser, in 1942. Note casemates at bow. The United States resumed building light cruisers in 1918, largely because the ships it then had in service had become obsolete. The first of these, the 10 Omaha-class ships, displaced 7050 tons and were armed with 12 6-inch (152 mm) guns. Eight of these guns.

Omaha class light cruiser

The Omaha-class cruisers were a class of light cruisers built for the United States Navy. The oldest class of cruiser still in service with the Navy at the outbreak of World War II, the Omaha class was an immediate post-World War I design. Maneuvers conducted in January 1915 made it clear that the US Atlantic Fleet lacked the fast cruisers that were necessary to give information of the.

Omaha class light cruiser

USS Omaha (CL 4) USS Raleigh (CL 7) USS Richmond (CL 9) USS Trenton (CL 11) USS Marblehead (CL 12) Soviet Navy (more on Soviet Navy) Murmansk (ex. USS Milwaukee) 10 Light cruisers (11 names) of the Omaha class.

Omaha class light cruiser

The Admiralty also sought to define a new type of light cruiser to replace the old Omaha class from the 1920s. The concept had resulted in a lightweight generic ship exclusively armed with the new standard 5-in (127 mm) dual purpose, twin turrets. Semi-automated, these had excellent anti-aircraft capabilities as well as anti-ships and became widespread on the USN.

Omaha class light cruiser

Omaha was the lead ship of the Omaha-class light cruiser of the United States Navy. She was originally classified as a scout cruiser. She was the second US Navy ship named for the city of Omaha, Nebraska. After the US entered the war she continued her activities of guarding convoys in the Atlantic between South America and Western Africa. During this time she sank two German blockade runners.

Omaha class light cruiser

Cruiser Classes. Leyte Gulf - the light carrier Princeton hit by a lone Judy on 24 October 1944 with devastating effect. Here Birmingham comes alongside to give assistance. A devastating explosion would later sink the carrier and do dreadful execution among the men exposed on the cruiser's upperworks. Rate this photo. 363: 6.832: 1,022: Concord - Omaha class light cruiser - kindly provided by.

Category:Omaha class cruiser - Wikimedia Commons.

Omaha class light cruiser

Ten Omaha class light cruisers were completed for the U.S. Navy in the early to mid-1920s. They were the first American cruisers authorized since 1904 and were regarded as clumsy designs compared to their contemporaries in other naval services. Overview of 10 vessels Citations for this data available on individual ship pages: Name Builder Laid Down Launched Completed Fate Omaha: Todd Shipyard.

Omaha class light cruiser

The United States resumed building light cruisers in 1918, largely because the ships it then had in service had become obsolete. The first of these, the 10 Omaha class ships, displaced 7050 tons and were armed with 12 6-inch (152 mm) guns. Eight of these guns were mounted in double-story casemates at the bow and stern, a reflection of the US prewar preference for heavy end-on fire.

Omaha class light cruiser

Look at other dictionaries: USS Omaha (CL-4) — was the lead ship of Omaha class of light cruiser of the United States Navy. She was the second U.S. Navy ship named for the city of Omaha, Nebraska. Omaha was laid down December 6, 1918, by the Todd SB DD Co. of Tacoma, Washington.

Omaha class light cruiser

The Omaha-class cruisers were a class of light cruisers built for the United States Navy.The oldest class of cruiser still in service with the Navy at the outbreak of World War II, the Omaha class was an immediate post-World War I design.

Omaha class light cruiser

The Omahas were completed in 1923-1925. The first cruisers built by the United States since 1905, they reflected a long design process marked by strong disagreement about what kind of cruisers were needed. Discussion ranged from scout cruisers to battle cruisers, but the final design was a small scout cruiser, sometimes described as a super destroyer, which was to have very high speed.

Omaha class light cruiser

The Omaha-class cruisers were a class of light cruisers built for the United States Navy. The oldest class of cruiser still in service with the Navy at the outbreak of World War II, the Omaha class was an immediate post-World War I design. Maneuvers conducted in January 1915 made it clear that the US Atlantic Fleet lacked the fast cruisers necessary to provide information on the enemy's.

Omaha class light cruiser

Raleigh 1941 WTJ-0844250D Omaha class light cruiser circa 1941. After pre-war addition of AA armament throughout the ship. Does not include airplane which can be purchased separately (ships were often seen without a plane on the catapult). Can also be used as Milwaukee, Cincinnati, Raleigh, Detroit, Richmond, Concord, Trenton, Marblehead, Memphis. Quantity O'Bannon 1942 WTJ-0844350A Fletcher.

Omaha Class Light Cruiser - World War.

The USA built no cruisers between the Salem class of 1905 and the Omaha class of 1917 because there was serious disagreement as to what type of cruiser the USN needed. The initial requirements for the 1917 Scout, as it was known, included a speed in excess of 30kts, an endurance of 10,000nm and an armament of not less than six 6in guns on a displacement of about 8,000 tons. This was soon.The US Navy had spent most of the intervening decade arguing about the type of cruisers they needed, producing a wide range of designs from very light scout cruisers up to massive battlecruisers. The Omaha class cruisers were ordered as part of the 1916 naval programme, which also included a large number of destroyers and fast cruisers.Omaha is a light cruiser based on USS Omaha (CL-4). Omaha was the earliest modern light cruiser of U-country. She had a slender hull, with speed up to 35 knots. She was equipped with 152 mm guns and assigned as a reconnaissance ship and lead-ship of destroyers. Omaha was more competitive than most light cruisers at that time. She did not carry out any front line task, because she was already.


The first post-war class, the Omaha class light cruisers, were quite old fashioned ships, with half of their 6in guns carried in casemates mounted on the sides of the superstructure. During the First World War the US Navy came in close contact with the Royal Navy. The wartime Cavendish or Hawkins class cruisers particularly impressed. They had around the same displacement as the eventual.The Omaha class was designed specifically in response to the British Centaur subclass of the C-class cruiser. Although from a modern viewpoint, a conflict between the US and Great Britain seems implausible, US Navy planners during this time, and up to the mid-1930s, considered Britain to be a formidable rival for power in the Atlantic, and the possibility of armed conflict between the two.